Open Source CMS, Closed Source CMS, Choosing a CMS - Clarity Ventures



open source versus closed source cms systems

As more and more companies stay in-house for website management, they find that using a smooth, user-friendly CMS (Content Management System) is a must. There are a wide array of CMS’s out there, and it can be difficult to choose one for your business. The two major categories of CMS are open-source and closed-source. Below, you’ll learn about the difference between the two, so that you’ll be able to decide which one is right for your business.

Open-Sourced CMS versus Closed-Source CMS

An open-source CMS is one that has been developed by numerous people. Since the source code is open for anyone to use, open-source software is likely to evolve quickly and contain new, innovative approaches to old problems. It is much easier to customize open-source software, rather than closed source software, to suit your needs. The disadvantages to choosing open-source software over closed source software is that since the code is so readily available, it can be more easily hacked. Closed source software leads to more security and support. However, closed source software is also costlier, more time consuming, and requires more individualized experts than open-source software.

Choosing a CMS for eCommerce

There are a number of effective CMS’s for eCommerce, both closed source (Shopify, Volusion) and open-source (Wordpress, DotNetNuke). Because of the large community that supports open-source software, its ease of use, and its ability to be swiftly customized, Clarity generally recommends choosing open-source CMS systems for eCommerce. However, if you have the time and resources for closed source CMS systems, they can be just as worthwhile.

If a large number of people will be accessing and updating your CMS, or if you will not be assigning the project to a trained web developer, then choose a CMS with simple, attractive templates.

Other CMS Considerations

The main thing to consider when you choose a CMS is the number of people who will have access to it, and the skill level of the personnel involved. If a large number of people will be accessing and updating your CMS, or if you will not be assigning the project to a trained web developer, then choose a CMS with simple, attractive templates and an abundance of user support, like Wordpress. Speak to a Clarity representative today if you still have questions about which CMS to choose.

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